A Clockwork Orange – Anthony Burgess

READ FOR BOOKCLUB
Chosen by Becks

Amongst a backdrop of dystopian violence is a story about good and evil and the right to human freedom. 

⚑ “I was left a wee bit traumatised after reading A Clockwork Orange in 6th Form English and so was nervous about a re-read. However, it was certainly not as baddiwad as I recalled, and in fact, this time I found it both hilarious, in a perverse satirical way, and philosophical. The violence may have been the shocking memory of my teenage read, but as a more widely read person, I now appreciate the juxtaposition of violence vs farcicality and the social themes of free-thought vs state control. Plus I now viddy how the dystopian Nadsat language helped offset the horror of the violence.

“For example Alex and his droogs may have been attempting to drat and have the old in-out with a soomka in her own domy but the comical moment where the koshka attack and he ends up punching one of them in the litso made me guff. And when the Ludivco brainwashing technique begins, this is where the real raskazz begins and where philosophical arguments are piqued: what are the rights of citizens both decent and immoral, and when is it okay for the state to interfere with the individuality of its citizens for the greater good?

“This expression of individualism, written in the 60s when such a topic was hot, ensured this shocking story was to become a timeless and forever relevant read that makes no appypolly loggy for its content. I now understand why this horrorshow book was once considered required College reading.” – Rachel

⚑ “Oh my, what a book! I would describe reading it as ‘a crazy, unsettling ride’. As so much has been written of it and about it, I’m confining my thoughts to the two most striking things about it for me, the impressions, the ‘learning’, if you like …

“Firstly, the lingo, the youth slang. So clever, helping elevate the book to a level it might not otherwise have done. Yes, difficult to read, but like learning a foreign language I found I quickly began to get the hang of it, even though I didn’t necessarily understand every single word. I think it helped to build depth into the narrator and give the story an otherworldly quality.

“The second thing I find most memorable, was the ending. Oh how I felt let down by the ending! Such fizzer to what otherwise would be a powerful piece! That said, perhaps it is from this that I go back for a second read, perhaps to better understand what the author was trying to say beyond entertainment and impact?” – Sonya

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Published 1963
William Heinemann
192 pages

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